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Child Health nieuws

Regenerative Medicine and collaboration at the Utrecht Science Park

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Childhood cancer: research into genetic predisposition

Combining medical data and DNA analysis will help identify children with a genetic predisposition.

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Feb 14: Genetic volume buttons affect autoimmune diseases

In patients with autoimmune diseases such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the immune system starts to act against the body's own cells. Investigator Janneke Peeters at UMC Utrecht has now discovered that this happens because the 'volume buttons' of certain genes in the immune cells are too high. Also, the recycling process of broken parts in immune cells in people with an autoimmune disease is too fast. Medications that slow down these processes may offer a solution in the long term.

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Major Research Grant for Pre-eclampsia study in Ghana

The ongoing SPOT (Severe Pre-eclampsia Outcome Triage) study recently received a $985k grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. This study is conducted in a collaboration between the University Medical Center Utrecht (Julius Global Health, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care), Ghana Health Services (Greater Accra Regional Hospital), Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, H3Africa and the University of Tennessee.

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Research Center of Excellence for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

The pediatric rheumatology research group of UMC Utrecht has been named Research Center of Excellence for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). The group is working on a tailor-made treatment for children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Reuma Nederland supports this long-term scientific research, because it offers the prospect of what children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis are entitled to: a safe and tailor-made treatment. To make this possible, they donate € 500,000,- for research in the next five years.

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Oct 25: Bacteria in the nose and pharynx are related to risk of respiratory infections in babies

The bacterial composition of the nose and pharynx of young children and elderly people seems to influence the risk and severity of respiratory infections. This conclusion is drawn by Wouter de Steenhuijsen Piters, who will be awarded a PhD on October 25 in Utrecht.

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Interleukin-1 blockade effective as a starting treatment in systemic juvenile arthritis

Nienke ter Haar has investigated the role of different types of white blood cells and demonstrated that a new treatment strategy for patients with systemic juvenile arthritis with interleukin-1 blockade (IL-1 blockade, with the new biological drug anakinra) is the first choice, with most patients achieving rapid and long-term reduction of disease symptoms. She also concludes that neutrophilic granulocytes (a type of immune cells) play an important role in the early disease mechanisms of the disease, and that IL-1 blockade is an effective treatment for restoring neutrophils.

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Online training for general practitioners reduces antibiotic use in children

A targeted online training program for general practitioners (GPs), together with an information booklet for parents, resulted in fewer antibiotic prescriptions for children with respiratory tract infections. Unnecessary antibiotic use can thus be reduced relatively easy, and offers advantages such as a lower risk of antibiotic resistance, fewer side effects and less health care costs. Anne Dekker draws these conclusions in het research, on which she will be awarded a PhD on 27 September in Utrecht.

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Aug 30: Maternal vaccine can prevent infant mortality due to RSV infection

A respiratory infection with the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of hospitalization in young children. Vaccination of pregnant women seems a good strategy to prevent life-threatening RSV infections in infants immediately after birth up to several months thereafter. This was concluded by Nienke Scheltema in her research on which she will be awarded a PhD in Utrecht on August 30.

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Large DNA study for childhood cancer initiated

The Princes Máxima Center and UMC Utrecht started an extensive project on the DNA changes associated with pediatric oncology. Aberrations in DNA can cause a cell to become cancerous. For the right diagnosis and treatment, it is crucial to know where these mutations occur on the DNA.

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